Projects
Agape Orphan
Most of the children we sponsor do not have a mother or father and were left to struggle as best they could with no support. Extended families do the best they can but given the levels of extreme poverty in the region, expenditure on schooling and simply feeding an extra mouth, is frequently more than they can manage.
Many children have never been to school even though some are in their teens.
Orphan Care
It is inspiring to see desperately deprived and sad children come alive again...
Many children have never been to school even though some are in their teens. Primary school education is supposed to be free in Uganda but many do not have access as they can't afford to pay for essential requirements such as books and uniforms. Secondary school education is even more expensive.

The children in our programme are mainly living within their own extended family and TEAMS pays school fees and contributes to their upkeep, paying for school items with an allowance towards food, soap and other essentials.
We've helped change the lives of 20 orphan children this year.
It is inspiring to see desperately deprived and sad children come alive again and despite having lived in the midst of war and terrible difficulties the majority of the children in the programme say they want to be teachers, doctors and lawyers, a vision that is unlikely to be realized in most instances but it shows they are keen to get on in life!
Literacy Programme
Literacy Programme
Due to the overwhelming response to our classes, we subsequently opened a subsidiary class in an area of Gulu called Agwee (2008), and have on average, 20 students attend the Saturday class.
Recent studies have shown that 1 in 5 female youth have received no education and that as few as 1 in 3 are functionally literate. Further figures reveal that 43% of women have indicated a complete inability to read or write - alarming figures that point to the critical need to invest in functional literacy for women and youth.(source: The state of female youth in Northern Uganda, www.sway-uganda.org, April 2008).
30 students will be able to read and write English this year.
We started our first literacy class in 2005 at the Sanctuary building with 20 women and a couple of men. The oldest student, aged 76 years, learnt to write her name for the very first time. Since then we have seen more than 1900 students, mainly women, complete level 1 and 2 functional adult literacy classes, and be certificated in official graduation days. The natural development of the classes has seen the addition of a third level that pays particular emphasis to English.
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There are 26 literacy instructors; 233 students in 2014, 176 being awarded national certificates; nearly 2000 people have attended the literacy programme from 2007-2014
We are improving adult literacy within the community, enabling people to become active players in income generation. The classes have enabled personal reading and betterment and many are able to help their children with home work. Due to the overwhelming response to our classes we opened classes in Gulu Central Prison for inmates, which led to many going onto Primacy and Secondary level education during their prison term. We are now the only organisation continuing Functional Adult Literacy classes across northern Uganda.
Stitches
In 2007 “STITCHES” sewing school was started with a pilot project of enthusiastic students from the TEAMS on site adult literacy classes.
Now in its 8th year the 2 year part time course includes practical and theory with further English and Health related lessons.
There are very few opportunities for women to learn a skill in Northern Uganda and they are frequently undervalued. We offer a chance for many to gain a life skill but also aim to build self-esteem.

Most students who enter “STITCHES” are drawn from the literacy programme thereby ensuring that our projects adopt an integrated approach to development. Some exceptions have been made, 2 prison wardens from Gulu woman’s prison were added to our student list, the Prison Governor giving them time off to learn this skill to then share with the prisoners and we also have a few young teenage mothers who cannot return to school.

Now in its 8th year the 2 year part time course includes practical and theory with further English and Health related lessons. For 3 years students have sat Uganda’s National Department of Industrial Training exams and we have had some great results.

John Bosco, “JB” the school’s teacher since April 2010, is experienced and popular. He is trained in machine maintenance which means that all of our equipment is kept in good working order – vital in such a dusty environment and the students learn this important skill too! Christine, a former outstanding student, assists JB with practical lessons especially teaching some of the finer hand sewing techniques.
Stitches Enterprise
The school was started with enthusiastic students from the TEAMS on site adult literacy classes.
The addition of wonderful new classrooms this year has been amazing, we have been able to enrol 25 students in Year 1 as we now have so much more space, we and they are so proud as it is the best building for miles! In view of the increasing numbers TEAMS expect this programme to cost approximately £1,500 to run this year. A relatively small sum of money but the impact on so many lives is great.

Are you willing to help us?
SEAMS
Sewing School
SEAMS has been successful in making school uniforms for a number local schools and their reputation is growing outside of the local area.
SEAMS, as with all TEAMS projects, ran for a year as a pilot project. Due to its success it has become a fully functioning business. Housed in one of the new rooms within the Education Block it has a light bright room in which to produce its goods for sale.

The ladies who work within SEAMS have all graduated from STITCHES sewing school and produced the highest results. This is extremely important as the ethos of SEAMS is to make very good quality items.
Sewing School
Headbands and various other items have been made for sale in upmarket tourist hotels in Murchison Falls National Park and also in the UK.
SEAMS has been successful in making school uniforms for a number local schools and their reputation is growing outside of the local area. A variety of bags, aprons, headbands and a variety of other items that have been made for sale in upmarket tourist hotels in Murchison Falls National Park and also in the UK. Profits for these activities are generally higher than for sales within the local market.

The SEAMS ladies are paid a small salary and then take a profit share for the goods sold. The business is moving towards self-sufficiency, but for the time being we still need to fund part of this programme’s cost. Our hope is that this business will expand to internet sales in the future.
Health Programme
Health Programme
4290 patients are visited personally by a member of the team, with over 40 members from 7 churches now involved in this ministry.
Over the years we have looked to develop a health work that is both effective and sustainable, the formative stages including the identification of some of the health needs of our orphan children. In recent years we have built strong links with the local hospitals and medical school, the fruit of which is the launch of a hospital visitation ministry team comprised of 33 people from local churches, community health outreach events, and training initiatives.

Community health training

Our development in Layibi provides a room that serves as a basic health assessment clinic. We have conducted basic health assessments on employees, local inhabitants and children enrolled in the Agape child support initiative. Affordable access to quality health care and education at grass root level are critical in the community, especially for women and children. With this dilemma in mind, we sought to provide rural communities with a greater knowledge of basic health concerns through our community based training programmes.

The health work began in 2008 with hospital visitation from members of the local churches. Over 40 members from 7 churches are now involved in this ministry with 4290 patients personally visited 2012. Provision of emergency practical help is also provided such as sanitary pads, food and transport where support is possible. This work has now spread involving all hospitals in Gulu (public, private and the independent hospitals) and a local community clinic.

Since 2010 a Village Health Worker (VHW) Training programme was established involving local leadership. Some 50 VHWs were trained with 5 from each of the core 10 churches. They completed training in the government accredited Village Health Teams training and NGO accredited Community Based Health Care training with some using those qualifications to go onto higher education in pharmacy and clinical officer (Felix one of our VHT leaders has now graduated as a clinical officer at Gulu University and is in full time work).

Since October 2011 we have established a core leadership team of 11 leaders to coordinate the VHT programme. There is the VHT coordinator and one leader from each church of the 5 VHTs per church.
27 Medical Officers are being trained to evangelise in their field of work
One highlight for our VHTs was their involvement in World AIDS Day on December 1st 2012. TEAMS were among the 16 partner organizations including the World Health Organisation who targeted a specific area of Gulu with the highest incidence of HIV.
Agriculture
Agriculture
TEAMS has about 2 acres of land at Layibi which is used for cultivation. We focus on compact cash crops to maximise the full potential of this land.
TEAMS has about 2 acres of land at Layibi which is used for cultivation. We focus on compact cash crops to maximise the full potential of this land. A further half an acre is planted as a protective foliage area around our bees. Particular pollen generating trees and shrubs were chosen not only for the bees benefit and to offer us some protection too, but also to help improve the flavour of TEAMS honey! The remainder of our 5 acre site is either developed or laid out as amenity open space.

A long standing employee, Sam Nyeko has been given the responsibility of heading our agricultural project and he works closely with Alice, James and Stephen our gardeners.

Beans, Avocados, Ocre, Peas, Watermelons, Cabbage, Onions and G Nuts (peanuts to the Brits) are grown, as well as a small but growing nursery section where we propagate plants from seed to sell on. We have recently started a small banana plantation and hope to intersperse this with other fruit trees. Our harvests are improving, particularly since we installed a gravity fed water distribution system around the site which is fed from our borehole tank.
We would like to go a stage further and install drip-feed irrigation as this would enable crops to be produced during the 2 dry seasons each year.
A dialogue with the Agricultural Faculty of Gulu University to share knowledge and expertise has recently been initiated which is really encouraging and is an exciting venture.
Our nursery beds
Our nursery beds
We want this programme to become self-sufficient for TEAMS within the next 18 months. You could help us achieve this by contributing to our irrigation appeal. We need a minimum of 10mUGX (approximately £2,000) to install a drip feed system on our productive land.
Bee Project
Bees are vital to pollination and sustainable horticulture and the honey they produce provides a source of income generation for the community. 2008 saw the start of our bee keeping project with 12 hives, 11 of which are now populated.

Sam Nyeko is our Apiarist and together with helpers, he harvests the honey twice a year and the quality seems to improve with each harvest.

New shrubs have been planted around the hives to give more shade and protection for the bees. The types of shrubs were chosen to improve the honey’s flavour.

Bees are vital for pollination and sustainable horticulture so we are pleased to incorporate this programme into our green credentials.
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Bee Project
Bees are vital to pollination and sustainable horticulture and the honey will provide a source of income generation for the community.
The honey always sells very quickly as people appreciate its nutritional value and Ugandan’s love anything sweet! Whilst only small quantities are produced at the moment, its sale provides a useful income for TEAMS. We hope to continue to improve and one day may be good enough to run an educational programme based on Bee keeping. We have plans to establish Apiaries on other sites around Gulu.
Micro Finance Club
In an environment where people are desperately short of money and where banks charge extortionate rates of interest TEAMS MFC has been set up to make small loans at much lower fair rates of interest. We aim to help serve the community and once it has been decided a person can afford to borrow they join The Club. It is very important to us that they will be able to eat and pay rent as well as pay back the loan so we happily offer financial advice and guidance where needed.
Once we reach our optimum size, we hope that surplus income can be used by TEAMS to assist with salaries and other running costs.
People borrow money for a variety of purposes from starting small businesses to paying school fees – although education is officially free in practice it is not as every child has to contribute towards the schools list of expenses. We have also helped people meet unforeseen medical expenses.

Our membership continues to grow with over 50 members for 2015. Our activities are only limited by the amount of loan capital we have available for this programme. Since 2010, our initial Loan capital of 9,350,000/= (about £2,000 in today’s money) has grown to 20,000,000/= (c £5,000) so not only are we providing a valuable service based on Christian ethics we are also generating a useful source of income for TEAMS.

Once we reach our optimum size, we hope that surplus income can be used by TEAMS to assist with salaries and other running costs.
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Mirco Finance
Our membership continues to grow with over 50 members for 2015.
Do you have some spare cash that you could loan to us, interest free, for a year or more for this purpose? We can use it to help those people who cannot borrow money commercially and generate a income for TEAMS. Please do let us know. With UK interest rates being so low at the moment, this loan to TEAMS will not cost much in lost income to you!
TEAMS Building Project
TEAMS is blessed to have a 5 acre site on the outskirts of Gulu, the largest town in northern Uganda. We have built a church with 3 small office rooms, a toilet block and a small annex which presently houses our clinic.

In 2011 and 2013 we received money from very generous donors to build a classroom block. TEAMS is keen to expand its vocational training programmes so this was an answer to prayer. We were desperately cramped in the church offices.

Internationally acclaimed architects Haskolls, very kindly agreed to prepare all plans for us on a Pro bono basis. Work started in February 2014 using local trades people, thus helping the local economy and 4 superb classrooms were completed (under budget) last year. With great attention to detail, these classrooms have a cleverly designed air-flow system which draws the hot air up through the building thus keeping the rooms remarkably cool.
In 2011 and 2013 we received money from very generous donors to build a classroom block.
The classrooms have solar power, an air handling system, can each comfortably seat between 30 – 50 people for lectures and training purposes and cost just £37,500! Money can go a very long way in Uganda if it is handled carefully! When officially opened, a number of the local community leaders declared them the best educational facility in their area. We think they are right! What do you think? Please let us know.
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TEAMS Building Project
TEAMS is blessed to have a 5 acre site on the outskirts of Gulu, the largest town in northern Uganda.
Appeal

2 classrooms are fully used, but the other two are only used occasionally as funding is needed to start other programmes. Our vision is to have a broad selection of “Skills For Life & Machine Knitting” programmes to help those people in this very poor area to support themselves. There is a great demand for courses such as business skills; book keeping; knitting; agriculture; bee keeping; carpentry; bicycle maintenance and repair and many more simple, but important things. The running cost of a basic course averages £120 per month. This covers a teacher’s salary and the necessary consumables. The initial start-up costs of a programme vary considerably. A Book keeping or business skills course requires little more than desks and benches, but a knitting course would require several expensive machines. Please think and pray about this. 12 people willing to commit to £10 per month regular giving could start a course that over the years will change many people’s lives for the better. Can you help us with this?